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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 363505, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/363505
Review Article

Insights Gained from P. falciparum Cultivation in Modified Media

The Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA

Received 15 May 2013; Accepted 23 June 2013

Academic Editors: A. V. O. Ofulla and C. Ouma

Copyright © 2013 Sanjay A. Desai. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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