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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 409413, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/409413
Review Article

Salinity Tolerance Turfgrass: History and Prospects

Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University Putra Malaysia, 43300 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 20 June 2013; Accepted 25 August 2013

Academic Editors: G. E. Brust and T. Takamizo

Copyright © 2013 Md. Kamal Uddin and Abdul Shukor Juraimi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Land and water resources are becoming scarce and are insufficient to sustain the burgeoning population. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting agricultural productions across the world. Cultivation of salt-tolerant turfgrass species may be promising option under such conditions where poor quality water can also be used for these crops. Coastal lands in developing countries can be used to grow such crops, and seawater can be used for irrigation of purposes. These plants can be grown using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can provide food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products and can be used for landscape reintegration. There are a number of potential turfgrass species that may be appropriate at various salinity levels of seawater. The goal of this review is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant turfgrasses, their current and potential uses, and their potential use in developing countries. The future for irrigating turf may rely on the use of moderate- to high-salinity water and, in order to ensure that the turf system is sustainable, will rely on the use of salt-tolerant grasses and an improved knowledge of the effects of salinity on turfgrasses.