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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 412950, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/412950
Research Article

Healthy Lifestyles of University Students in China and Influential Factors

1School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
2Department of Development & Planning, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China

Received 5 May 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editors: C. L. Holt and H. L. Wipfli

Copyright © 2013 Dong Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study was conducted to analyze to what extent university students exhibit healthy lifestyles and which sociodemographic variables influence healthy lifestyles. 4809 university students randomly selected were measured by use of the Healthy Lifestyle Scale for University Students questionnaire. When controlling for the other variables, the total healthy lifestyles score was predicted by gender, grade, father’s level of education, and type of institution; exercise behaviour was partially predicted by gender, grade, type of institution, and family monthly income; regular behaviour was modulated by gender, grade, type of institution, family monthly income, and father’s educational level; nutrition behaviour was partially affected by type of institution, family monthly income, and father’s educational level; health risk behaviour was modulated by gender, mother’s level of education, and family monthly income; health responsibility was modulated by gender, grade, type of institution, and father’s educational level; social support was modulated by gender, grade, and father’s educational level; stress management was modulated by gender, grade, type of institution, and mother’s education level; life appreciation was modulated by grade, type of institution, and mother’s educational level. These influences should be taken into account in designing interventions for specific socio-demographic profiles that might be at higher risk for certain behaviours.