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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 516906, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/516906
Research Article

The Influence of Negative Emotion on the Simon Effect as Reflected by P300

1School of Management, Zhejiang University, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027, China
2Neuromanagement Lab, School of Management, Zhejiang University, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027, China

Received 21 October 2013; Accepted 2 December 2013

Academic Editors: H. Abraham, N. Berretta, J. P. Card, and P. Schwenkreis

Copyright © 2013 Qingguo Ma and Qian Shang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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