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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 519080, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/519080
Research Article

Nexfin Noninvasive Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring: Validation against Continuous Pulse Contour and Intermittent Transpulmonary Thermodilution Derived Cardiac Output in Critically Ill Patients

1Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Ziekenhuis Netwerk Antwerpen, ZNA Stuivenberg, Lange Beeldekensstraat 267, 2060 Antwerp, Belgium
2Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Schwanenweg 21, 24105 Kiel, Germany

Received 13 July 2013; Accepted 15 September 2013

Academic Editors: L. M. Gillman, D. Karakitsos, A. E. Papalois, and A. Shiloh

Copyright © 2013 Koen Ameloot et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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