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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 541710, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/541710
Research Article

Human SLC26A1 Gene Variants: A Pilot Study

1Mater Research, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia
2Department of Nephrology, University of Queensland at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
3Pathology Department, Mater Misercordiae Hospital, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia

Received 5 August 2013; Accepted 4 September 2013

Academic Editors: L. Bao and S. Thamilselvan

Copyright © 2013 Paul A. Dawson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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