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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 587024, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/587024
Research Article

The Serological and Virological Investigation of Canine Adenovirus Infection on the Dogs

1Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Selcuk, 42075 Konya, Turkey
2Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Kyrgyzstan-Turkey Manas, Bishkek 720044, Kyrgyzstan
3Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Mehmet Akif Ersoy, 15100 Burdur, Turkey
4Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Mehmet Akif Ersoy, 15100 Burdur, Turkey

Received 18 July 2013; Accepted 21 August 2013

Academic Editors: D. Endoh and G. T. Pharr

Copyright © 2013 Oya Bulut et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188–54.7%) blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188–45.2%) blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs.