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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 670621, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/670621
Research Article

Genetic Variants of Neurotransmitter-Related Genes and miRNAs in Egyptian Autistic Patients

1Department of Biochemistry, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
2Department of Clinical Genetics, National Research Centre, Giza, Egypt
3Department of Molecular Genetics, National Research Centre, Giza, Egypt
4Department of Child Psychiatry, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Received 28 August 2013; Accepted 1 October 2013

Academic Editors: K. Csiszar, S. Mastana, and J. L. Vilotte

Copyright © 2013 Ahmed M. Salem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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