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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 675898, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/675898
Review Article

The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

1Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Parasitas e Vetores, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2Laboratório de Imunopatologia, Departamento de Patologia Médicina, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil

Received 7 December 2012; Accepted 1 January 2013

Academic Editors: S. Amaral Gonçalves da Silva and P. Grellier

Copyright © 2013 Ingrid Evans-Osses et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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