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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 734923, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/734923
Research Article

The Segmental Morphometric Properties of the Horse Cervical Spinal Cord: A Study of Cadaver

1Department of Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Selcuk, Selcuklu, 42075 Konya, Turkey
2Department of Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Kirikkale, Yahsihan, 71451 Kirikkale, Turkey

Received 25 December 2012; Accepted 16 January 2013

Academic Editors: N. J. Christensen, J. Gonzalez-Soriano, and H. Moriyama

Copyright © 2013 Sadullah Bahar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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