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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 767968, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/767968
Research Article

The Antioxidant Status and Concentrations of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin E in Metabolic Syndrome

1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
2School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
3Center for Education and Research on Geriatrics and Gerontology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
4School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
5Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
6The Intensive Care Unit, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40705, Taiwan
7Department of Nutrition and Institute of Biomedical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, Taichung 43346, Taiwan

Received 1 July 2013; Accepted 31 July 2013

Academic Editors: A. Chicco and A. Turrini

Copyright © 2013 Chi-Hua Yen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). Subjects with MS ( ) were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group ( ) was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS ( ) after being adjusted for coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E.