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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 154539, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/154539
Research Article

Analysis of Herbaceous Plant Succession and Dispersal Mechanisms in Deglaciated Terrain on Mt. Yulong, China

1MOE Key Laboratory of Western China’s Environmental Systems, Collaborative Innovation Centre for Arid Environments and Climate Change, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 73000, China
2State Key Laboratory of Cryosphere Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Lanzhou 730000, China
3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China

Received 13 January 2014; Revised 9 July 2014; Accepted 22 July 2014; Published 23 October 2014

Academic Editor: Béla Tóthmérész

Copyright © 2014 Li Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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