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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 167681, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/167681
Research Article

Ethylene Response Factor Sl-ERF.B.3 Is Responsive to Abiotic Stresses and Mediates Salt and Cold Stress Response Regulation in Tomato

1Laboratoire de Morphogenèse et de Biotechnologie Végétale, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (FST), Campus Universitaire 2092 El Manar Tunis, Tunisia
2Université Toulouse, INP ENSA Toulouse, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
3INRA, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
4LR Biotechnologie et Valorisation des Bio-Géo Ressources (LR11ES31), Institut Supérieur de Biotechnologie, Université de La Manouba Biotech Pole de Sidi Thabet, Sidi Thabet, 2020 Ariana, Tunisia

Received 27 March 2014; Revised 6 June 2014; Accepted 8 July 2014; Published 6 August 2014

Academic Editor: Chang Won Choi

Copyright © 2014 Imen Klay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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