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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 179375, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/179375
Research Article

Analysis of Factors Influencing Telephone Call Response Rate in an Epidemiological Study

1Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Avenida Prof. Martín Lagos S/N, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2Neurology and Neurophysiology Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Torrecárdenas, 04009 Almería, Spain
3Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
4Neurology Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Llerena-Zafra, 06900 Badajoz, Spain
5Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico Universitario San Cecilio, 18012 Granada, Spain
6Research Operations Office, IT Department, Spanish Society of Neurology, San Sebastian de los Reyes, 28701 Madrid, Spain

Received 27 May 2014; Revised 29 August 2014; Accepted 16 September 2014; Published 21 October 2014

Academic Editor: Hind A. Beydoun

Copyright © 2014 Jorge Matías-Guiu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Descriptive epidemiology research involves collecting data from large numbers of subjects. Obtaining these data requires approaches designed to achieve maximum participation or response rates among respondents possessing the desired information. We analyze participation and response rates in a population-based epidemiological study though a telephone survey and identify factors implicated in consenting to participate. Rates found exceeded those reported in the literature and they were higher for afternoon calls than for morning calls. Women and subjects older than 40 years were the most likely to answer the telephone. The study identified geographical differences, with higher RRs in districts in southern Spain that are not considered urbanized. This information may be helpful for designing more efficient community epidemiology projects.