Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 179375, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/179375
Research Article

Analysis of Factors Influencing Telephone Call Response Rate in an Epidemiological Study

1Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Avenida Prof. Martín Lagos S/N, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2Neurology and Neurophysiology Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Torrecárdenas, 04009 Almería, Spain
3Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
4Neurology Unit, Complejo Hospitalario Llerena-Zafra, 06900 Badajoz, Spain
5Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico Universitario San Cecilio, 18012 Granada, Spain
6Research Operations Office, IT Department, Spanish Society of Neurology, San Sebastian de los Reyes, 28701 Madrid, Spain

Received 27 May 2014; Revised 29 August 2014; Accepted 16 September 2014; Published 21 October 2014

Academic Editor: Hind A. Beydoun

Copyright © 2014 Jorge Matías-Guiu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. Ekman and J. E. Litton, “New times, new needs; E-epidemiology,” European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 22, no. 5, pp. 285–292, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. Sinclair, J. Otoole, M. Malawaraarachchi, and K. Leder, “Comparison of response rates and cost-effectiveness for a community-based survey: postal, internet and telephone modes with generic or personalised recruitment approaches,” BMC Medical Research Methodology, vol. 12, article 132, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. Siemiatycki, S. Campbell, L. Richardson, and D. Aubert, “Quality of response in different population groups in mail and telephone surveys,” The American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 120, no. 2, pp. 302–314, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. C. W. Russell, D. A. Boggs, J. R. Palmer, and L. Rosenberg, “Use of a web-based questionnaire in the Black Women's health study,” The American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 172, no. 11, pp. 1286–1291, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. M. H. J. van Gelder, R. W. Bretveld, and N. Roeleveld, “Web-based questionnaires: the future in epidemiology?” American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 172, no. 11, pp. 1292–1298, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. M. Statland, Y. Wang, R. Richesson et al., “An interactive voice response diary for patients with non-dystrophic myotonia,” Muscle and Nerve, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 30–35, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. W. S. Shaw and S. K. Verma, “Data equivalency of an interactive voice response system for home assessment of back pain and function,” Pain Research and Management, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 23–30, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. B. C. Choi, “Computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) for health surveys in public health surveillance: methodological issues and challenges ahead,” Chronic Diseases in Canada, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 21–27, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. Matías-Guiu, J. Porta-Etessam, V. Mateos, S. Díaz-Insa, A. Lopez-Gil, and C. Fernández, “One-year prevalence of migraine in Spain: a nationwide population-based survey,” Cephalalgia, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 463–470, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. J. Greene, H. Speizer, and W. Wiitala, “Telephone and web: mixed-mode challenge,” Health Services Research, vol. 43, no. 1, part 1, pp. 230–248, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. K. Verma, T. K. Courtney, D. A. Lombardi et al., “Internet and telephonic IVR mixed-mode survey for longitudinal studies: choice, retention, and data equivalency,” Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 72–74, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. C. Bexelius, H. Merk, S. Sandin et al., “Interactive voice response and web-based questionnaires for population-based infectious disease reporting,” European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 693–702, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. D. A. Dillman, G. Phelps, R. Tortora et al., “Response rate and measurement differences in mixed-mode surveys using mail, telephone, interactive voice response (IVR) and the Internet,” Social Science Research, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 1–18, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. R. Curtin, S. Presser, and E. Singer, “Changes in telephone survey nonresponse over the past quarter century,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 87–98, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. R. M. Groves, “Nonresponse rates and nonresponse bias in household surveys,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 646–675, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. E. A. Nohr, M. Frydenberg, T. B. Henriksen, and J. Olsen, “Does low participation in cohort studies induce bias?” Epidemiology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 413–418, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. P. J. Serrano-Castro, I. García-Morales, F. J. Hernández-Ramos et al., “Validation of a short useful questionnaire in Spanish for the epidemiological screening of epilepsy in Spain. EPIBERIA Questionnaire,” Neurologia, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 24–32, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. “Recommendations guiding physicians in biomedical research involving human subjects. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki,” Le Journal Médical Libanais, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 88–89, 1994.
  19. L. T. Midanik and T. K. Greenfield, “Reports of alcohol-related problems and alcohol dependence for demographic subgroups using interactive voice response versus telephone surveys: the 2005 US national alcohol survey,” Drug and Alcohol Review, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 392–398, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. P. Rodriguez, T. von Glahn, W. H. Rogers, H. Chang, G. Fanjiang, and D. G. Safran, “Evaluating patients' experiences with individual physicians: a randomized trial of mail, internet, and interactive voice response telephone administration of surveys,” Medical Care, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 167–174, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. T.-H. Shih and F. Xitao, “Comparing response rates from web and mail surveys: a meta-analysis,” Field Methods, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 249–271, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. F. J. Fowler Jr., P. M. Gallagher, V. L. Stringfellow, A. M. Zaslavsky, J. W. Thompson, and P. D. Cleary, “Using telephone interviews to reduce nonresponse bias to mail surveys of health plan members,” Medical Care, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 190–200, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. T. P. Johnson, Y. I. Cho, R. T. Campbell, and A. L. Holbrook, “Using community-level correlates to evaluate nonresponse effects in a telephone survey,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 704–719, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. K. A. Balter, O. Balter, E. Fondell, and Y. T. Lagerros, “Web-based and mailed questionnaires: a comparison of response rates and compliance,” Epidemiology, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 577–579, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. E. Singer, “Nonresponse bias in household surveys,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 637–645, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. K. G. Abraham, A. Maitland, and S. M. Bianchi, “Nonresponse in the American time use survey: who is missing from the data and how much does it matter?” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 676–703, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. G. Cohen and J. C. Duffy, “Are nonrespondents to health surveys less healthy than respondents?” Journal of Official Statistics, vol. 18, pp. 13–23, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  28. M. H. Criqui, E. Barrett-Connor, and M. Austin, “Differences between respondents and non-respondents in a population-based cardiovascular disease study,” The American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 108, no. 5, pp. 367–372, 1978. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. L. J. Melton III, P. J. Dyck, J. L. Karnes, P. C. O'Brien, and F. J. Service, “Non-response bias in studies of diabetic complications: the rochester diabetic neuropathy study,” Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 46, no. 4, pp. 341–348, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. Paganini-Hill, B. Ducey, and M. Hawk, “Responders versus nonresponders in a dementia study of the oldest old: the 90+ study,” American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 177, no. 12, pp. 1452–1458, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. F. Boersma, J. A. Eefsting, W. D. van Brink, and W. van Tilburg, “Characteristics of non-responders and the impact of non-response on prevalence estimates of dementia,” International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 1055–1062, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. S. Galea and M. Tracy, “Participation rates in epidemiologic studies,” Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 643–653, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. E. de Leeuw, M. Callegaro, J. Hox, E. Korendijk, and G. Lensvelt-Mulders, “The influence of advance letters on response in telephone surveys a meta-analysis,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 413–443, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. S. McCluskey and A. E. Topping, “Increasing response rates to lifestyle surveys: a pragmatic evidence review,” Perspectives in Public Health, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 89–94, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. P. J. Edwards, I. Roberts, M. J. Clarke et al., “Methods to increase response to postal and electronic questionnaires,” Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol. 3, Article ID MR000008, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. R. C. Kessler, R. J. A. Little, and R. M. Groves, “Advances in strategies for minimizing and adjusting for survey nonresponse,” Epidemiologic Reviews, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 192–204, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. D. A. Dillman, J. G. Gallegos, and J. H. Frey, “Reducing refusal rates for telephone interviews,” Public Opinion Quarterly, vol. 40, pp. 66–78, 1976. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. S. I. Woodruff, J. A. Mayer, and E. Clapp, “Effects of an introductory letter on response rates to a teen/parent telephone health survey,” Evaluation Review, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 817–823, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. T. D. Koepsell, V. McGuire, W. T. Longstreth Jr., L. M. Nelson, and G. van Belle, “Randomized trial of leaving messages on telephone answering machines for control recruitment in an epidemiologic study,” The American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 144, no. 7, pp. 704–706, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. S. E. Majowicz, V. L. Edge, J. Flint et al., “An introductory letter in advance of a telephone survey may increase response rate,” Canada Communicable Disease Report, vol. 30, no. 13, pp. 121–123, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. W. Smith, T. Chey, B. Jalaludin, G. Salkeld, and T. Capon, “Increasing response rates in telephone surveys: a randomized trial,” Journal of Public Health Medicine, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 33–38, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. B. Robertson, M. Sinclair, A. Forbes, M. Kirk, and C. K. Fairley, “The effect of an introductory letter on participation rates using telephone recruitment,” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 24, no. 5, p. 552, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. R. N. Carey, A. Reid, T. R. Driscoll, D. C. Glass, G. Benke, and L. Fritschi, “An advance letter did not increase the response rates in a telephone survey: a randomized trial,” Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 66, no. 12, pp. 1417–1421, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. C. M. Byrne, J. D. Harrison, J. M. Young, W. S. Selby, and M. J. Solomon, “Including the questionnaire with an invitation letter did not improve a telephone survey's response rate,” Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 1312–1314, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus