Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 186016, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/186016
Research Article

Effective Control of Bioelectricity Generation from a Microbial Fuel Cell by Logical Combinations of pH and Temperature

1Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
2Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
3College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128, China

Received 27 December 2013; Accepted 27 January 2014; Published 11 March 2014

Academic Editors: B. Cao, Y.-C. Yong, and S.-G. Zhou

Copyright © 2014 Jiahuan Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. B. E. Logan, B. Hamelers, R. Rozendal et al., “Microbial fuel cells: methodology and technology,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 40, no. 17, pp. 5181–5192, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. K. Rabaey and W. Verstraete, “Microbial fuel cells: novel biotechnology for energy generation,” Trends in Biotechnology, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 291–298, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. V. B. Wang, S. L. Chua, B. Cao et al., “Engineering PQS biosynthesis pathway for enhancement of bioelectricity production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa microbial fuel cells,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 5, Article ID e63129, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  4. L. M. Tender, S. A. Gray, E. Groveman et al., “The first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell as a viable power supply: powering a meteorological buoy,” Journal of Power Sources, vol. 179, no. 2, pp. 571–575, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. F. Zhang, L. Tian, and Z. He, “Powering a wireless temperature sensor using sediment microbial fuel cells with vertical arrangement of electrodes,” Journal of Power Sources, vol. 196, no. 22, pp. 9568–9573, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C.-P. Siu and M. Chiao, “A microfabricated PDMS microbial fuel cell,” Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 1329–1341, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. Katz and M. Pita, “Biofuel cells controlled by logically processed biochemical signals: towards physiologically regulated bioelectronic devices,” Chemistry, vol. 15, no. 46, pp. 12554–12564, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. E. Katz and I. Willner, “A biofuel cell with electrochemically switchable and tunable power output,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 125, no. 22, pp. 6803–6813, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. L. Amir, T. K. Tam, M. Pita, M. M. Meijler, L. Alfonta, and E. Katz, “Biofuel cell controlled by enzyme logic systems,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 826–832, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. K. T. Tsz, G. Strack, M. Pita, and E. Katz, “Biofuel cell logically controlled by antigen-antibody recognition: towards immune-regulated bioelectronic devices,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 131, no. 33, pp. 11670–11671, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. Zhou, Y. Du, C. Chen et al., “Aptamer-controlled biofuel cells in logic systems and used as self-powered and intelligent logic aptasensors,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, no. 7, pp. 2172–2174, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y. Yuan, S. Zhou, J. Zhang, L. Zhuang, G. Yang, and S. Kim, “Multiple logic gates based on reversible electron transfer of self-organized bacterial biofilm,” Electrochemistry Communications, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 62–65, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. Z. Li, M. A. Rosenbaum, A. Venkataraman, T. K. Tam, E. Katz, and L. T. Angenent, “Bacteria-based and logic gate: a decision-making and self-powered biosensor,” Chemical Communications, vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 3060–3062, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. Y. Yuan, S. Zhou, N. Xu, and L. Zhuang, “Electrochemical characterization of anodic biofilms enriched with glucose and acetate in single-chamber microbial fuel cells,” Colloids and Surfaces B, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 641–646, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. Y. Liu, H. Kim, R. Franklin, and D. R. Bond, “Gold line array electrodes increase substrate affinity and current density ofelectricity-producing G. sulfurreducens biofilms,” Energy and Environmental Science, vol. 3, no. 11, pp. 1782–1788, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. Esteve-Núñez, J. Sosnik, P. Visconti, and D. R. Lovley, “Fluorescent properties of c-type cytochromes reveal their potential role as an extracytoplasmic electron sink in Geobacter sulfurreducens,” Environmental Microbiology, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 497–505, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. A. Gonzalez del Campo, J. Lobato, P. Cañizares, M. A. Rodrigo, and F. J. Fernandez Morales, “Short-term effects of temperature and COD in a microbial fuel cell,” Applied Energy, vol. 101, pp. 213–217, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. S. Jung, M. M. Mench, and J. M. Regan, “Impedance characteristics and polarization behavior of a microbial fuel cell in response to short-term changes in medium pH,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 45, no. 20, pp. 9069–9074, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. Y. Yong, Z. Cai, Y. Yu et al., “Increase of riboflavin biosynthesis underlies enhancement of extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella in alkaline microbial fuel cells,” Bioresource Technology, vol. 130, pp. 763–768, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  20. M. A. Teravest, Z. Li, and L. T. Angenent, “Bacteria-based biocomputing with cellular computing circuits to sense, decide, signal, and act,” Energy and Environmental Science, vol. 4, no. 12, pp. 4907–4916, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Fricke, F. Harnisch, and U. Schröder, “On the use of cyclic voltammetry for the study of anodic electron transfer in microbial fuel cells,” Energy and Environmental Science, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 144–147, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. Y. Liu, F. Harnisch, K. Fricke, R. Sietmann, and U. Schröder, “Improvement of the anodic bioelectrocatalytic activity of mixed culture biofilms by a simple consecutive electrochemical selection procedure,” Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 1006–1011, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. B. Cao, B. Ahmed, D. W. Kennedy et al., “Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 45, no. 13, pp. 5483–5490, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. R. Nakamura, K. Ishii, and K. Hashimoto, “Electronic absorption spectra and redox properties of C type cytochromes in living microbes,” Angewandte Chemie, vol. 48, no. 9, pp. 1606–1608, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. M. Collinson and E. F. Bowden, “UV-visible spectroscopy of adsorbed cytochrome c on tin oxide electrodes,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 64, no. 13, pp. 1470–1476, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus