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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 239208, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/239208
Research Article

A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

1Laboratory of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, 60430-160 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Integrated Laboratory of Biomolecules (LIBS), Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, 60430-160 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
3Laboratory of Biologically Actives Molecules, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Federal University of Ceará, 60440-970 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
4Institute of Chemical and Geosciences, Federal University of Pelotas Institute of Chemical and Geosciences, Federal University of Pelotas, 96160-000 Pelotas, RS, Brazil
5Computer Engineering of Sobral, Federal University of Ceará, 62042-280 Sobral, CE, Brazil

Received 30 May 2014; Accepted 2 October 2014; Published 5 November 2014

Academic Editor: Alberto A. Iglesias

Copyright © 2014 Juliana Montezuma Barbosa Monteiro Tínel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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