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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 265394, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/265394
Review Article

The Effect of Maternal Stress Activation on the Offspring during Lactation in Light of Vasopressin

1Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szigony utca 43, 1083 Budapest, Hungary
2János Szentágothai School of Neurosciences, Semmelweis University, Üllői utca 26, 1085 Budapest, Hungary

Received 30 August 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013; Published 14 January 2014

Academic Editors: G. P. Chrousos and C. C. Juhlin

Copyright © 2014 Anna Fodor and Dóra Zelena. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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