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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 340690, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/340690
Review Article

The Role of IL-33 in Host Response to Candida albicans

1Department of Dermatology, Hospital do Meixoeiro (CHUVI) and University of Vigo, C/Meixoeiro S/N, Vigo, 36200 Galicia, Spain
2Department of Dermatology, Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González, Calzada de Tlalpan 4800, Tlalpan, 14000 México City, DF, Mexico
3Department of Emergency, CHUVI, Hospital do Meixoeiro (CHUVI), C/Meixoeiro S/N, Vigo, 36200 Galicia, Spain
4Department of Dermatology (Section of Mycology), Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González, Calzada de Tlalpan 4800, Tlalpan, 14000 México City, DF, Mexico

Received 9 January 2014; Revised 16 June 2014; Accepted 17 June 2014; Published 21 July 2014

Academic Editor: Emil Toma

Copyright © 2014 C. Rodríguez-Cerdeira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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