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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 406159, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/406159
Review Article

Spinal Fusion in the Next Generation: Gene and Cell Therapy Approaches

1Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Francesco Vito, 1, 00168 Rome, Italy
2Departement of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
3Latium Musculoskeletal Tissue Bank, Largo Francesco Vito, 1, 00168 Rome, Italy

Received 30 August 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013; Published 28 January 2014

Academic Editors: H.-Y. Lin and H. Park

Copyright © 2014 Marta Barba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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