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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 431792, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/431792
Research Article

Exploration of Potential Roles of a New LOXL2 Splicing Variant Using Network Knowledge in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041, China
2Department of Pathology, Shantou Central Hospital, Affiliated Shantou Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Shantou, Guangdong 515041, China
3Institute of Oncologic Pathology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041, China

Received 28 March 2014; Revised 1 July 2014; Accepted 14 July 2014; Published 31 August 2014

Academic Editor: Rui Medeiros

Copyright © 2014 Bing-Li Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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