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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 487563, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/487563
Research Article

Connecting Soil Organic Carbon and Root Biomass with Land-Use and Vegetation in Temperate Grassland

1School of Natural Resource Sciences Range Science Program, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108-6050, USA
2Natural Sciences, Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL 32085-1027, USA
3Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-6013, USA
4Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
5Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Ecology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA

Received 19 July 2014; Revised 15 September 2014; Accepted 16 September 2014; Published 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Antonio Paz González

Copyright © 2014 Devan Allen McGranahan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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