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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 506392, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/506392
Research Article

Germination and Early Growth of Brassica juncea in Copper Mine Tailings Amended with Technosol and Compost

Department of Plant Biology and Soil Science, University of Vigo, As Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Spain

Received 28 August 2013; Accepted 10 November 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editors: D. Businelli and H. Hu

Copyright © 2014 Luís A. B. Novo and Luís González. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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