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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 521349, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/521349
Review Article

The Neurobiological Pathogenesis of Poststroke Depression

1The Yiwu Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Huajiachi Campus, Kaixuan Road No. 268, Jianggan District, Hangzhou 310029, Zhejiang, China
2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, China

Received 16 November 2013; Accepted 28 January 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editors: M. Bourin, G. Gainotti, and C. Gastó Ferrer

Copyright © 2014 Chao Feng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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