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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 523216, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/523216
Research Article

Cortical Source Multivariate EEG Synchronization Analysis on Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment in Type 2 Diabetes

1School of Information Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, China
2School of Electrical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, China
3Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Second Artillery Corps of PLA, Beijing 100875, China
4State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
5Center for Collaboration and Innovation in Brain and Learning Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
6National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China

Received 2 July 2014; Accepted 14 August 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Jing Li

Copyright © 2014 Dong Cui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Is synchronization altered in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and normal cognitive functions subjects in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)? Resting eye-closed EEG data were recorded in 8 aMCI subjects and 11 age-matched controls in T2DM. Three multivariate synchronization algorithms (-estimator (), synchronization index (SI), and global synchronization index (GSI)) were used to measure the synchronization in five ROIs of sLORETA sources for seven bands. Results showed that aMCI group had lower synchronization values than control groups in parietal delta and beta2 bands, temporal delta and beta2 bands, and occipital theta and beta2 bands significantly. Temporal (; ) and occipital (; ) theta values were significantly positive correlated with Boston Name Testing. In sum, each of methods reflected that the cortical source synchronization was significantly different between aMCI and control group, and these difference correlated with cognitive functions.