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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 602747, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/602747
Research Article

Contributions of Nonleaf Organs to the Yield of Cotton Grown with Different Water Supply

The Key Laboratory of Oasis Ecology Agriculture of Xinjiang Production and Construction Group, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003, China

Received 1 April 2014; Accepted 13 May 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Urs Feller

Copyright © 2014 Dongxia Zhan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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