Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 612608, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/612608
Research Article

Deflection of Resilient Materials for Reduction of Floor Impact Sound

1Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea
2Department of Global Construction Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea

Received 23 May 2014; Accepted 8 September 2014; Published 28 October 2014

Academic Editor: Massimo Pellizzari

Copyright © 2014 Jung-Yoon Lee and Jong-Mun Kim. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Recently, many residents living in apartment buildings in Korea have been bothered by noise coming from the houses above. In order to reduce noise pollution, communities are increasingly imposing bylaws, including the limitation of floor impact sound, minimum thickness of floors, and floor soundproofing solutions. This research effort focused specifically on the deflection of resilient materials in the floor sound insulation systems of apartment houses. The experimental program involved conducting twenty-seven material tests and ten sound insulation floating concrete floor specimens. Two main parameters were considered in the experimental investigation: the seven types of resilient materials and the location of the loading point. The structural behavior of sound insulation floor floating was predicted using the Winkler method. The experimental and analytical results indicated that the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor significantly increased with increasing the tangent modulus of resilient material. The deflection of the floating concrete floor loaded at the side of the specimen was much greater than that of the floating concrete floor loaded at the center of the specimen. The Winkler model considering the effect of modulus of resilient materials was able to accurately predict the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor.