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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 617032, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/617032
Review Article

Effect of Cytokines on Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption during Mechanical Force Loading of the Periodontal Membrane

1Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Department of Translational Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
2Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8588, Japan

Received 31 August 2013; Accepted 20 November 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editors: E. L. Hooghe-Peters, C. Rosales, and H. Taki

Copyright © 2014 Hideki Kitaura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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