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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 627916, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/627916
Research Article

Screening of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) Accessions for High Salt Tolerance

1Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 18 March 2014; Revised 8 May 2014; Accepted 8 May 2014; Published 9 June 2014

Academic Editor: Luigi Cattivelli

Copyright © 2014 Md. Amirul Alam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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