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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 637065, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/637065
Review Article

Vascular Calcification and Renal Bone Disorders

1Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 23148, Taiwan
2Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan
3Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonghe Cardinal Tien Hospital, 80 Zhongxing Street, Yonghe District, New Taipei City 23445, Taiwan

Received 30 March 2014; Revised 15 June 2014; Accepted 28 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Keiju Hiromura

Copyright © 2014 Kuo-Cheng Lu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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