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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 643694, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/643694
Research Article

Body Size Mediated Coexistence in Swans

1Appalachian Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Frostburg, MD 21532-2307, USA
2Department of Biology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-1270, USA
3Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-3900, USA

Received 28 August 2013; Accepted 24 October 2013; Published 4 February 2014

Academic Editors: R. Julliard and S. Rossi

Copyright © 2014 Katharina A. M. Engelhardt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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