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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 714561, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/714561
Review Article

Biological Functionalities of Transglutaminase 2 and the Possibility of Its Compensation by Other Members of the Transglutaminase Family

Biomedical Research Group, Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science & Technology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT, UK

Received 2 October 2013; Accepted 30 October 2013; Published 23 March 2014

Academic Editors: B. Poulain, M. Shimaoka, and M. M. M. Wilhelmus

Copyright © 2014 Benedict Onyekachi Odii and Peter Coussons. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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