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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 782763, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/782763
Research Article

Bioaccessibility In Vitro of Nutraceuticals from Bark of Selected Salix Species

1Department of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Life Sciences, Skromna Street 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
2Department of Industrial and Medicinal Plants, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka 15, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
3Department of Thermal Technology, University of Life Sciences, Doświadczalna 44, 20-280 Lublin, Poland
4Department of Ecology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Akademicka 19, 20-033 Lublin, Poland

Received 31 August 2013; Accepted 29 December 2013; Published 17 February 2014

Academic Editors: P. Cos and W. Gelderblom

Copyright © 2014 Urszula Gawlik-Dziki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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