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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 816450, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/816450
Research Article

Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Essential Oil from Leaves of Xylopia laevigata in Experimental Models

1Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49.000-100 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
2Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49.000-100 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
3Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49.000-100 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
4Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, CEP 49.000-100 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
5Colegiado de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal do Vale do São Francisco, 56.304-205 Petrolina, PE, Brazil
6Laboratório de Farmacologia Pré-Clinica (LAPEC), Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Avenida Tancredo Neves, S/N, Bairro, Rosa Elza, 49.000-100 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil

Received 24 January 2014; Revised 10 June 2014; Accepted 10 June 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Luca Antonioli

Copyright © 2014 João Carlos C. Queiroz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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