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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 936560, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/936560
Research Article

The In Vitro Effect of Ivermectin on the Activity of Trehalose Synthesis Pathway Enzymes and Their mRNA Expression in the Muscle of Adult Female Ascaris suum (Nematoda)

Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury, Oczapowski 1A Street, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland

Received 10 July 2014; Accepted 21 August 2014; Published 27 October 2014

Academic Editor: Mehmet Yakup Arica

Copyright © 2014 Małgorzata Dmitryjuk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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