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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 946851, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/946851
Research Article

Visual Perception during Mirror-Gazing at One’s Own Face in Patients with Depression

1DIPSUM, Università di Urbino, Via Saffi 15, 61029 Urbino, Italy
2Unità Operativa di Psichiatria “Villa Santa Chiara”, Via Monte Recamao 7, Quinto di Valpantena, 37142 Verona, Italy
3Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milano, Italy

Received 11 July 2014; Revised 3 November 2014; Accepted 3 November 2014; Published 20 November 2014

Academic Editor: Pietro Pietrini

Copyright © 2014 Giovanni B. Caputo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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