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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 239815, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/239815
Research Article

Isolated Vitamin D Deficiency Is Not Associated with Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome, but with Thyroid Autoimmunity

1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Diskapi Training and Research Hospital, 06330 Ankara, Turkey
2Department of Biochemistry, Diskapi Training and Research Hospital, 06330 Ankara, Turkey
3Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, School of Medicine, Ankara University, 06230 Ankara, Turkey
4Translational Research Center, Diskapi Teaching and Research Hospital, 06330 Ankara, Turkey
5Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine (Kastamonu), Hacettepe University, 06330 Ankara, Turkey

Received 28 July 2014; Accepted 14 December 2014

Academic Editor: Yehuda Shoenfeld

Copyright © 2015 Muyesser Sayki Arslan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. This study aimed to compare thyroid functions, thyroid autoantibodies, and the existence of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) according to vitamin D level. Materials and Methods. The study included age- and BMI-matched healthy volunteers with and without vitamin D deficiency. In addition, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome status was evaluated. Results. Anti-TPO positivity was significantly more common in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency, as compared to those with a normal 25(OH)D level. Furthermore, TSH levels were significantly lower in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency than in those with a normal 25(OH)D level. In addition, there was a significant weak inverse correlation between anti-TPO positivity and the 25(OH)D level and a positive correlation between the TSH level and 25(OH)D level. Only 1 thyroid function test result was compatible with NTIS among the participants with moderate vitamin D deficiency; therefore the difference was not significant. Conclusions. The prevalence of thyroid autoantibody positivity was higher in those with severe and moderate vitamin D deficiency than in those with a normal 25(OH)D level. Additional large-scale studies must be conducted to determine if vitamin D deficiency plays a causal role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and NTIS.