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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 639369, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/639369
Research Article

The Effect of a 12-Week Moderate Intensity Interval Training Program on the Antioxidant Defense Capability and Lipid Profile in Men Smoking Cigarettes or Hookah: A Cohort Study

1Laboratory of Pharmacology, Sfax Medicine Faculty SMF, Avenue Majida Boulila, 3029 Sfax, Tunisia
2Laboratory of Cardio-Circulatory, Respiratory, and Hormonal Adaptations to Muscular Exercise, Ibn El Jazzar Medicine Faculty, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4002 Sousse, Tunisia
3Research Unit (EM2S), Sfax Institute of Sport and Physical Education, Airport Road, P.O. Box 384, 3000 Sfax, Tunisia

Received 25 July 2014; Revised 27 December 2014; Accepted 27 December 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe La Torre

Copyright © 2015 Abdessalem Koubaa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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