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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 858016, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/858016
Research Article

Physiochemical Studies of Sodium Chloride on Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) and Its Possible Recovery with Spermine and Gibberellic Acid

Department of Botany, Scottish Church College, 1 and 3 Urquhart Square, Kolkata 700006, India

Received 31 July 2014; Revised 24 October 2014; Accepted 31 October 2014

Academic Editor: Aryadeep Roychoudhury

Copyright © 2015 Srijita Ghosh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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