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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2016, Article ID 8641373, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8641373
Review Article

Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China

Received 6 January 2016; Revised 2 April 2016; Accepted 28 April 2016

Academic Editor: Charles Hocart

Copyright © 2016 Samaneh Sadat Maleki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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