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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8367042, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8367042
Research Article

Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antioxidant Activities of Byrsonima duckeana W. R. Anderson (Malpighiaceae)

1Department of Pharmacy, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
2Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Federal University of Amazonas, Manaus, AM, Brazil
4Center of Biological and Health Sciences, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
5Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Amazonas, Manaus, AM, Brazil
6DeMpSter Mass Spectrometry Group, Amazonas State University, Manaus, AM, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Fernanda Guilhon-Simplicio

Received 22 December 2016; Accepted 9 February 2017; Published 6 March 2017

Academic Editor: Valdir Cechinel Filho

Copyright © 2017 Maria Christina dos Santos Verdam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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