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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8591249, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8591249
Research Article

Histomorphological Description of the Digestive System of Pebbly Fish, Alestes baremoze (Joannis, 1835)

1Abi Zonal Agricultural Research & Development Institute, National Agricultural Research Organisation, P.O. Box 219, Arua, Uganda
2College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources & Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
3Aquaculture Research & Development Center, National Agricultural Research Organisation, P.O. Box 530, Kampala, Uganda

Correspondence should be addressed to Victoria Tibenda Namulawa; moc.oohay@ykyvadnebit

Received 15 February 2017; Revised 1 May 2017; Accepted 14 May 2017; Published 17 July 2017

Academic Editor: Thomas E. Adrian

Copyright © 2017 Nasser Kasozi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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