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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2010, Article ID 418596, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/418596
Research Article

Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus

1Environmental Medicine Consortium and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA
2U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, 4210 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
3Centre for Wildlife Ecology, Simon Fraser University, 5421 Robertson Road, RR1, Delta, BC, Canada V4K 3N2

Received 1 September 2009; Revised 19 December 2009; Accepted 21 January 2010

Academic Editor: Cinzia Benazzi

Copyright © 2010 Michael K. Stoskopf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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