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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2010, Article ID 727231, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/727231
Research Article

Disposition Kinetics of Levofloxacin in Sheep after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration

1Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, P.O. Box 12211, Egypt
2College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Received 31 May 2010; Revised 29 July 2010; Accepted 5 October 2010

Academic Editor: William Ravis

Copyright © 2010 Ayman Goudah and Sherifa Hasabelnaby. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study was planned to investigate the disposition kinetics of levofloxacin in plasma of female native Barky breed sheep after single intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration of 4 mg/kg body weight. The concentrations of levofloxacin in the plasma were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a UV detector on samples collected at 0, 0.08, 0.16, 0.33, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 18, 24, 32, and 48 h after treatment. Following intravenous injection, the decline in plasma drug concentration was biexponential with half-lives of ( 𝑡 1 / 2 𝛼 ) 0 . 3 3 ± 0 . 1 2  h and ( 𝑡 1 / 2 𝛽 ) 3 . 2 9 ± 0 . 2 3  h for distribution and elimination phases, respectively. The volume of distribution at steady state 𝑉 ( d ( s s ) ) was 0 . 8 6 ± 0 . 2 3  l/kg. After intramuscular administration of levofloxacin at the same dose, the peak plasma concentration ( 𝐶 m a x ) was 3 . 1 ± 0 . 3 5 𝜇 g/mL and was obtained at 1 . 6 4 ± 0 . 2 9  h ( 𝑇 m a x ) , the elimination half-life ( 𝑇 1 / 2 e l ) was 3 . 5 8 ± 0 . 3 0  h, and AUC was 2 0 . 2 4 ± 1 . 3 1 𝜇 g.h/mL. The systemic bioavailability was 9 1 . 3 5 ± 6 . 8 1 %. In vitro plasma protein binding was 23.74%. When approved therapy fails, levofloxacin may be used in some countries for therapy of food animals, however, that is not true in the US.