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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2011, Article ID 214384, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/214384
Review Article

Comparative Gamma Delta T Cell Immunology: A Focus on Mycobacterial Disease in Cattle

1Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1
2Department of Veterinary Pathology, 2720 Veterinary Medicine Complex, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA

Received 13 January 2011; Revised 22 February 2011; Accepted 15 March 2011

Academic Editor: Michael D. Welsh

Copyright © 2011 Brandon L. Plattner and Jesse M. Hostetter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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