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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2011, Article ID 495074, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/495074
Research Article

Mycobacteria in Terrestrial Small Mammals on Cattle Farms in Tanzania

1Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium
2Mycobacteriology Unit, Department of Microbiology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
3Entomology Unit, Department of Parasitology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
4Pest Management Centre, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
5Department of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
6Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35209, USA
7Danish Pest Infestation Laboratory, University of Aarhus, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Received 14 January 2011; Revised 12 March 2011; Accepted 1 April 2011

Academic Editor: Jesse M. Hostetter

Copyright © 2011 Lies Durnez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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