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Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing
Volume 2017, Article ID 5062371, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5062371
Research Article

Using Smartphones to Assist People with Down Syndrome in Their Labour Training and Integration: A Case Study

Department of Computer Engineering, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Javier Gomez; se.mau@onabircse.gj

Received 25 August 2017; Accepted 4 December 2017; Published 21 December 2017

Academic Editor: Evdokimos I. Konstantinidis

Copyright © 2017 Javier Gomez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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