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Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing
Volume 2018, Article ID 8971206, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8971206
Research Article

Cognitive Load Assessment from EEG and Peripheral Biosignals for the Design of Visually Impaired Mobility Aids

1Audio Communication Group, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
2Data Science Lab, Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI Foundation), Turin, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Charalampos Saitis; ed.nilreb-ut.supmac@sitias.sopmalarahc

Received 23 September 2017; Revised 10 January 2018; Accepted 30 January 2018; Published 28 February 2018

Academic Editor: Tao Gu

Copyright © 2018 Charalampos Saitis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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