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Analytical Cellular Pathology
Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 65-73
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/ACP-2011-0042

An Ultra-High Speed Whole Slide Image Viewing System

Yukako Yagi,1,2 Shigeatsu Yoshioka,3 Hiroshi Kyusojin,3 Maristela Onozato,1,2 Yoichi Mizutani,3 Kiyoshi Osato,3 Hiroaki Yada,3 Eugene J. Mark,1,2 Matthew P. Frosch,1,2 and David N. Louis1,2

1Pathology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
2Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
3Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan

Copyright © 2012 Hindawi Publishing Corporation and the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background: One of the goals for a Whole Slide Imaging (WSI) system is implementation in the clinical practice of pathology. One of the unresolved problems in accomplishing this goal is the speed of the entire process, i.e., from viewing the slides through making the final diagnosis. Most users are not satisfied with the correct viewing speeds of available systems. We have evaluated a new WSI viewing station and tool that focuses on speed.

Method: A prototype WSI viewer based on PlayStation®3 with wireless controllers was evaluated at the Department of Pathology at MGH for the following reasons: 1. For the simulation of signing-out cases; 2. Enabling discussion at a consensus conference; and 3. Use at slide seminars during a Continuing Medical Education course.

Results: Pathologists were being able to use the system comfortably after 0–15 min training. There were no complaints regarding speed. Most pathologists were satisfied with the functionality, usability and speed of the system. The most difficult situation was simulating diagnostic sign-out.

Conclusion: The preliminary results of adapting the Sony PlayStation®3 (PS3®) as an ultra-high speed WSI viewing system were promising. The achieved speed is consistent with what would be needed to use WSI in daily practice.