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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2014, Article ID 982073, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/982073
Research Article

Differential Immunotoxicity Induced by Two Different Windows of Developmental Trichloroethylene Exposure

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children’s Hospital Research Institute, 13 Children’s Way, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA

Received 1 October 2013; Revised 19 November 2013; Accepted 20 November 2013; Published 20 February 2014

Academic Editor: Aristo Vojdani

Copyright © 2014 Kathleen M. Gilbert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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